30 Day Dry-Aged Beef Breakdown!

Watch Daniel Barron take apart a prime beef 107 rib and throw it on the grill.

30 Day Taste Test

Troy Johnson tastes the finished product as he and Daniel Barron describe the results.


Once we got our hands on the beef, we gave individual ribeyes out to 3 top-notch chefs and told them they could cook it however they wanted to. This is what happened next:

Recipe: Scott Cannon cooks 30-day dry-aged beef

“I wanted to do something light and refreshing with it coming into the summertime; and not overpower the natural dry-aged flavors of the ribeye. So I paired it with a brown butter carrot puree, vadouvan parmesan crisp, caramelized shallot red wine demi glace and fresh carrots and pea tendrils.”

Recipe: Dry Aged Beef, Open Coal by Mikel Anthony

“I call this dish caveman ribeye. I clinched the steak directly on the coals, which is an old school technique I’ve never done before. I really wanted to push myself to be a better cook, to be a better chef – also utilize sous vide in that to incorporate some modern technique because that’s who I am as a chef. I went ahead and threw some eggplant and some stone fruit, some fig, and it really candied on that ember. The mushrooms, the zucchini and summer squash, I sauteed those in a wood fired oven to also incorporate some earthiness. I took some more eggplant and I pureed that with black garlic and I made a beautiful carrot puree, cause I knew that would really pop on those colors. To really bring it all together with some freshness, I cut some fresh cilantro blossoms and seeds. This steak was so sick.”

Recipe: Jocelyn Cano cooks beef with Molé Amarillo

“I took the 30 day dry aged ribeye and paired it with a not-very-well-know mole amarillo, which is a very underrated mole within the region of Mexico. It comes from the Oaxacan central valleys.

“I went ahead and paired it will all the beautiful vegetables which are around the area, and not so much – just because you want to be able to fuse together beautiful ingredients from different regions and make them shine. There are romano beans, we have thinly sliced heirloom tomatoes, quick-pickled serranos, a lemon parsnip puree, raw corn to showcase all of the corn that is used within the mole. In the traditional, more well-known mole, you would technically get masa of some sort, so here we just take that process away and go ahead and implement the actual corn along with some coriander flowers and cilantro as well, in order to accentuate the epazote flavors and the citrus flavors that we wanted to have shine throughout the dish. This is a beautiful representation of my culture and what I strive for on a daily basis which is to showcase the flavors I grew up with but in a much more detail oriented and upscale fashion.”


About the Project: Chef’s Roll has teamed up with Chef Daniel Barron, the Texas Beef Council and Wüsthof for an epic 365 Day Dry Aged Beef Project. We will be dry aging “107” USDA prime rib eyes for an entire year, while sampling the results at 30, 60, 90 and 180 day intervals. The project will culminate in a beef vertical dinner to include all intervals with the 365.

Our goal is to both educate and inspire chefs around the world to dry age beef safely. In Episode 1, Chef Daniel Barron goes over all the components for your own dry age setup. Episode 2, Barron installs all the components and walks us through his setup. Episode 3, Barron receives the meat and preps it for its year-long journey. The rest of the episodes, which will be posted here on ChefsRoll.com and also on YouTube, will be explorations of the beef’s characteristics at each stage, as Barron breaks down an entire rib and guest chefs incorporate it into a dish.

Future episodes will include taste comparisons of simply grilled steaks at the intervals plus guest chefs coming in to do creative recipes. Follow the project all year long on the website, app and social with #365DRYAGEDBEEFPROJECT.